5 use cases for ChatGPT you can try right now

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## Connect

Connect with Hugo Castellanos https://www.linkedin.com/in/hugocastellanos

Full transcript of episode available at LatinosWhoTech.com

Transcript
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Hello, and welcome to any of the other latinos who attack my name is Hugo Castellano.

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In this episode, I wanted to have a different format than I wanted to share some use cases

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for a chat GPT.

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I'm actually going to be in Europe for a few weeks, and I didn't want to rush, and

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and make an interview episode at the last minute.

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Because I have a couple episodes that I'll ready record it,

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but I really want to take the time to edit them

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and really make sure that they're formatting away

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that we're gonna have value to you.

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So I want to make a quick tutorial slash thing

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you can try right now, episode.

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Quick reminder that we are running tech meetups.

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If we zoom, we're doing speed networking.

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So if you want to sign up for any of those sessions,

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you can find the link in the show notes.

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I also have a quick survey that covers that ask you,

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what kind of content you want to get with these podcasts.

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And let's dive right in.

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So if, unless you've been living under a rock,

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you've probably heard of Chaggipiti and all these LLMs, large language models that are around

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like bar then claw then claw this actually a nice one you can actually attach files to it

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and ask the machine questions about the files but I wanted to showcase some of the five use cases

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that I actually take advantage of every week, not every day, but at least once a week, things

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that I do. And again, looking at what I do, so I'm an engineer, I'm getting my Masters

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in Computer Science and my host, two podcasts about Tech Careers. I also do Stand Up Comedy

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for fun and run meetups. Those are, that's like a good overview of what I'm about and the

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things that I do. And when it comes to how I use these applications, it's all tied up to my

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ADHD. For those that don't know, ADHD is this condition where you, um, yeah, what is ADHD?

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It's hard to define it in a single sentence. But it's basically a disorder. So it's a

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attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder. When it comes to adult, it's this fact that

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that your intentions are a bit disconnected from your actual actions, I'm motivations.

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So when it comes to actually doing things, you get distracted and it's hard to get focused.

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There's this idea of the shiny object that gets you distracted.

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And he has some very real consequences in your work life and your personal life.

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like interrupting people when they speak things like difficulty focusing on a task if I don't

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find it interesting things like memory issues when it comes to following up and short term

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memory, staying on the task at hand and just several ways of dealing with it with therapy and

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also medication and mainly systems. So the way that you do things or mainly things that you can

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do you're in the environment? Things like keeping your study or work area as free from

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distraction as possible, things like noise-councing headphones, things like training,

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your blocking websites, that is attractive. Things like that. When it comes to chat

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GPTA and things that I do with it is that it's fantastic because it helps me get things

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started. I need to show that people would

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indeed have and that I have is that it can be

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very easy for me to start things if they're

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interesting to me. Not so easy to finish them.

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And likewise things that I find annoying or not

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interesting or not engaging, I don't start

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I procrastinate on them. So those are the two instances

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were we're chatty with the he helps me first the finishing the things that I start and then

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starting and finishing things that I don't I don't particularly care to do so it comes to

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so it's the biggest use case you know defeating that blank page that's use case number one

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how do you overcome the the the blank page so when it comes to writing emails so writing

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emails that I've been putting off because I want to ask somebody a favor or a text message

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and something that is really annoying. Okay, like I need to book an appointment with my doctor

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or things like that or I need to request my doctor for refilling a medication or something like that.

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Actually, I just in the beginning, I just asked you a GPT right an email to asking for this.

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And once the machine did it, I just copy paste it, put it in my notes app.

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So I just copy-based it every time I have to text my doctor for something like that.

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So that's the biggest, not the biggest, but that's one of the use cases.

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So drafting emails and messages, that's a big one.

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Because what happens is that, sure, you're computing your to-do-lice that, oh yeah, book a doctor's

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appointment. And that thing is so annoying. Like, for people with ADHD because, yeah, because it's

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a drag is just a drag is for some reason is something that you should do but just because

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you should do it doesn't mean that you're going to do it. Another one is looking at and within

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the same use case of overcoming the blank page is coming up with with title ideas. So what I mean by

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this is not only the episodes that I do but also when I have a presentation or when I'm

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brainstorming topics to talk about. I get invited all the time to give workshops on productivity

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and networking, career development, how to find your dream career. And the audiences are always

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different. Sometimes our college students, sometimes our professionals with years of experience,

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sometimes I get high schoolers. So I have to modulate my message and make sure that, hey,

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I come up with the interesting examples. And I have a database of examples, I have a database of

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worships that I've done, but when it comes to titles, it's a struggle of it. Coming up with titles that are

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Informative, catchy, but not clickbaiting.

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So I will ask, chagipiti, hey, I want a title that it's classy and

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ticing, but not clickbait. And give me 10 ideas. So the machine will give me 10 ideas.

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And I'm calling it the machine in purpose because I want to remember that it is a machine.

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So yeah, and again, I don't use them right of the bat like I will modify them according to what I need.

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But again, it's in the same theme of the feeding the blank page.

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Another use case that I find very useful is an idea generator, and especially for gift ideas.

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Now when I maybe this happens to you, maybe it doesn't, but my circle of friends are not very

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materialistic people, like a lot of my friends, they don't care about physical gifts.

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It's more of experience people, quality time people, like, oh, let's all go out and do

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this new thing or let's all get together hang out and cook together for barbecue when play

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board games, I kind of think like most of my friends, like they're into those kinds of

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activities. So when it comes to GIF ideas for people that actually like gifts or for

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outing ideas, it's great. So give me 10 things that I can do in a rainy day with a group of

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five friends and actually give me some ideas because what happens is that when you're in the moment

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Like sure, you can have ideas, but are they good ideas?

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Only you can tell.

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So when you're in stock, when you're stuck, I find that

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Chagipiti is great for that.

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So defeating that blank page.

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Another use case that I really like,

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So third use case is processing data.

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So I'm part of a lot of WhatsApp groups,

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groups and maybe you are too on your Latino Latina and I'm a part of a lot of what's

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up groups and discord chats and things like that and what happens in a lot of these

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chats is that maybe there's a site conversations maybe you disconnected for a couple

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days or maybe your invocation or what have you and that there's I don't

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recommend you recommend you to just turn off all the notifications all together

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But what happens when you go back to a chat and 300 messages?

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What's a better use of your time?

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Actually, reading each message by each message or selecting all the text,

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dropping it and charging it in asking the machine,

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"Hey, can you summarize this conversation for me?"

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And if there are any action items with my name on them.

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And the machine will do that.

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I have a particular chat that I'm a part of.

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There's two people that they like to argue and they are very vocal in the way they argue.

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And it's not uncommon for them to have a 80 or 90 back and forth.

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So I will ask the machine to, or it will nominate the people in this conversation and the tone of the conversation.

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And I will tell me that oh it's adversarial, it's a debate, it's an summarized anything you want with it.

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So it's great because again it's a machine, it's fast.

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But you need to ask it the right questions.

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And the fort use case that I particularly enjoy it's Google in steroids.

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So basically I will ask it, I'm going to Barcelona for 10 days and I'm really into

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archeology, live music and history museums, not art museums.

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write me up a 10-day dinner area.

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And it will do that.

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And it will give you a starting point.

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Day by day with morning, afternoon, evening activities,

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and you can copy pages this into a Google Docs and just

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trim it and take what actually resonates with you and what

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doesn't.

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So if I give the verse a long example,

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but if it's a place that you've never been and you can actually, and it depends how you like to travel

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because a lot of people they like to travel scheduling stuff and actually saying, "Hey, we're going to do this from 1 to 3

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and then this from 5 to 6 or other people are just, "Hey, we're going to be there, they won.

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We only have to do this thing at 2 and then the rest of the day is free."

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The pencil on how you travel, the pencil on how you like, but as far as ideas for the trip,

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things that you can only do in that spot, a "Chagipity" is great.

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I do remember that we're going to use "Chagipity" for this is that the last instance

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when it was connected directly to the internet was in September 2021.

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So maybe it's not great as far as restaurants come and things that have open and close

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then but when it comes to generic sites things to do.

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Not like the statue of liberty has been there for a while.

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The generic places like they don't change.

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And it's also great for road trips.

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I find that hey, I'm driving from my house into this place.

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It's a make me an scenic route where I stop at least at one roadside diner.

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And it will do that. It will give you directions, things to do.

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It will write out the directions through the scenic route.

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So I find that for planning, pinnaries and trips and things like that nature.

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I find that it's a great first touch resource.

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Because again, you can...

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Because if you have the time and you like YouTube and things like that, sure,

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sure you can search, we have top 10 things to do in Madrid or top 20 things to not do in

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Paris or whatever and you can watch a 20 minute video if you want but I find that if I want

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to just get a quick overview in five minutes something that I can read at my own pace and

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and I don't have to withstand the antiques of travel to tours like a welcome guys to my

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channel subscribe. No thanks I don't need that. And yeah so for use cases so far so the first one is

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defeating the blank page at rewriting emails, scripts, titles, daily generator for gifts and experiences

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you have the drafting emails and messages from the beginning and some rising articles, some

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summarizing chats. That's something that I do quite often. And the last but not least is translating.

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And not translating, although you could use it for that translating from Spanish to English or

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French to English or whatever, when it comes to coding. So when when I have an assignment or a

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problem that I'm facing and I look at the code and I read it and I give myself some time

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let's say that okay I'm going to read this code for 15 minutes and see if I understand it

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and if I'm still struggling if it's not crystal clear to me what is this code supposed to do

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I will drop it in, I will ask the machine, "Hey, explain to me, live online, what does this module do?"

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And so it's basically like a stack overflow replacement in that sense, where I'm actually,

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I'm not asking the machine to summarize the code for me or to translate this from JavaScript to Python.

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You could do that if you have to do that. But when it comes to a learning environment,

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I like to give myself a designated amount of time where I'm actually going to try myself,

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the human carbon-based lifeform that I am, to actually figure out myself before I ask my

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or next machine overlords. Hey, explain this to me. Hey, silicon-based lifeform, explain this to the

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I just explained this to the monkey.

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(laughs)

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Just because, hey, it's,

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and again, it takes discipline to do it that way

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because, again, if I'm doing it for a class,

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it's like, I actually wanna learn the material

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like getting the ride or wrong answer on a test

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that's in the large scheme of things

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is in consequential, it's the you understand the material,

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the answer no, can you play it?

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If again, you're professionally employee working on something and you just need the machine

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to give you something quick, there are other resources, right?

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Like there's co-pilot that can write significant chunks of code for you.

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But again, it's useful for templates and things like that.

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But again, I wouldn't use it if I was just starting out and learning.

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I want to make sure you have a strong foundation.

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So I find that using it as a tutor, it's helpful.

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It's helpful to actually prove read stuff.

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And again, explain to me what does this code do?

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That's a valid use case.

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And when it comes to, and since we're talking about careers and a bonus use case, so I

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give you five use cases.

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A bonus use case is to review your resume.

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So actually, if you have a resume and you want to actually see if how good of a match you

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are to a job, you can copy paste the job description and copy paste your resume and ask

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it.

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Of the in my resume in a way that better matches my skill set for this job, that better

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highlights my skill set for this job.

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And it will actually modify your sentences.

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So you actually use some of the verbs that are in the job description.

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Of course, is your job to prove with it and make sure that, hey, it's not the exciting

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things.

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It's just formatting them in a different way.

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But it's very useful.

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It's very useful because if you're applying for a job, you want to make sure that you're

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experienced because we all have translatable experience.

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When it comes to project management,

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you can talk about stakeholder management

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and the results you've driven and communications kills

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and all those things,

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but they translate differently across industries.

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So when it comes to actually using keywords,

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they're gonna resonate in a different job

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that you're applying for.

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Why not use a machine to help you do that?

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And save you some time.

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you're actually applying for a large app.

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I also, I don't personally do this,

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but I've done it a couple times,

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but I don't do it often,

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is that I will, when I generate a draft of my resume,

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I will ask it to go over my resume

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and create a list of five roles

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that are best suited for this person.

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And in my case, it will speed out product marketing manager, competitive intelligence analyst,

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data analyst, and all these things that match my experience.

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So it's a way of actually doing the opposite.

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Instead of making sure that your resume matches the job description is to go the other way around

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and ask, "Okay, which job description matches the specimen?"

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So you can take, and again, so you can take a look at your experience and actually decide.

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Listen, like I'm too close to it, it's hard for me to tell which job should I apply for

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because I have all these experience, so which job titles actually match the experiences

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that I have.

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You guys will have a bias because you know what you've done and you know what you've done.

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And that sounds a bit creepy.

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So you're on experience. You know your own story.

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So it's a great way of actually separating yourself, giving some distance from your experience

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your own bias to what's actually on the paper was actually on black and white.

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So you could ask a friend or you could ask, "Touch a bity, good for you, quickly."

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quickly. So there we go. Different format, try to make it more casual, try to make it more

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actionable. Let me know if you like these kinds of episodes and you can let me know by following the

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link in the show notes in filling up the feedback form or you can also send me an email at the

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email in the show notes with your thoughts. Do you like these kinds of episodes or you prefer the

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interview format, what do you prefer? You can also write to me via Instagram @Latinoshotec

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on IG and yeah so thank you so much for your attention and look forward to the next episode.

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Thanks so much.

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